A new London exhibit examines Russian Constructivism, a modernist movement startling in it’s scope and often limited to a footnote in 20th century art history.  The major proponents hated the term “artist” and sought to destroy art altogeher—not as a nihilist salute but becuase they sought to create something better with which it could be rreplaced.   AS the writer linked above states, “What they created was probably the most intensive and creative art and architectural movement of the 20th century, a sourcebook so copious that there’s scarcely any movement since that wasn’t anticipated by something tried and discarded between 1915 and 1935 – from abstraction, pop art, op art, minimalism, abstract expressionism, the graphic style of punk and post-punk, to brutalism, postmodernism, hi-tech and deconstructivism.”
Nov 9, 2011 / 14 notes

A new London exhibit examines Russian Constructivism, a modernist movement startling in it’s scope and often limited to a footnote in 20th century art history.  The major proponents hated the term “artist” and sought to destroy art altogeher—not as a nihilist salute but becuase they sought to create something better with which it could be rreplaced.   AS the writer linked above states, “What they created was probably the most intensive and creative art and architectural movement of the 20th century, a sourcebook so copious that there’s scarcely any movement since that wasn’t anticipated by something tried and discarded between 1915 and 1935 – from abstraction, pop art, op art, minimalism, abstract expressionism, the graphic style of punk and post-punk, to brutalism, postmodernism, hi-tech and deconstructivism.”

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    Vladimir Tatlin | "Monument to the Third International" aka Tatlin’s Tower, 1919 St. Petersburg. 400 m ( It was designed...
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