Artist Kehinde Wiley’s monumental paintings placing contemporary African-American men in the postures of old masters have made the young artist a global phenomenon early in his career affording waiting lists, studios around the world and an army of assistants.  Wiley on his influences writes, “I have a fondness for making paintings that go beyond just having a conversation about art for art’s sake or having a conversation about art history. I actually really enjoy looking at broader popular culture. So, for example, in my last book of photography, the lighting was inspired as much by Tiepolo ceiling frescoes in Venice as it was by Hype Williams’s early-’90s hip-hop videos—both having a sense of rapture, both having a sense of this bling. One more sacred, one more profane.” Read more here.
Jun 2, 2013 / 8 notes

Artist Kehinde Wiley’s monumental paintings placing contemporary African-American men in the postures of old masters have made the young artist a global phenomenon early in his career affording waiting lists, studios around the world and an army of assistants.  Wiley on his influences writes, “I have a fondness for making paintings that go beyond just having a conversation about art for art’s sake or having a conversation about art history. I actually really enjoy looking at broader popular culture. So, for example, in my last book of photography, the lighting was inspired as much by Tiepolo ceiling frescoes in Venice as it was by Hype Williams’s early-’90s hip-hop videos—both having a sense of rapture, both having a sense of this bling. One more sacred, one more profane.” Read more here.



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